4 Ways COVID-19 Will Change Our World

Our world seems tossed about like an ocean liner on a raging sea. Where are we heading and who’s steering the ship?

It seems we’ve found our captains and they’re promising at least four ways they will use COVID-19 to change our world.

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On September 27, 2015, world leaders met in New York to sign an ambitious social covenant to change our world. The covenant is called, “Transforming Our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.”

Most people know it as “the New World Order.”

Agenda 2030 is a plan of action involving all countries and all stakeholders taking “bold and transformative steps” to “shift the world on to a sustainable and resilient path” by 2030.

Suddenly, we have COVID-19 and bold and transformative steps are changing our world at a rapid pace.

Here are four ways COVID-19 will change our world according to the July 2020 United Nations policy brief and other global policy influencers.

1 Wealth Redistribution

Wealth will flow from richer nations to poorer nations as investments targeting worldwide income inequality. Photo by Dazzle Jam on Pexels.com

The third item in Agenda 2030 addresses income inequality. It states, “We resolve, between now and 2030, to end poverty and hunger everywhere; to combat inequalities within and among countries . . . we resolve also to create conditions for sustainable, inclusive and sustained economic growth, shared prosperity and decent work for all, taking into account different levels of national development and capacities.”

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres emphasizes inequality will be the central feature of both short-term stimulus packages and long-term policy changes in post-COVID global recovery. Guterres insists policy changes will be instrumental in “accelerating progress towards universal health care.”

2 Worldwide Digitization

Investments will flow into Southeast Asia and other developing countries to bring the entire world into the digital age. Photo by Tyler Lastovich on Pexels.com

Why is there a coin shortage and some businesses refuse to accept cash? Why are we talking about contact tracing chips and mandatory COVID-19 vaccines?

The fifteenth item in Agenda 2030 promises to bring the entire world into the digital age: “The spread of information and communications technology and global interconnectedness has great potential to accelerate human progress, to bridge the digital divide and to develop knowledge societies, as does scientific and technological innovation across areas as diverse as medicine and energy.”

The July UN policy brief announces plans to bridge the digital divide across Southeast Asia “to ensure people and communities are not left behind in an increasingly digital world, where services and support are increasingly based on digital awareness, literacy and access.”

A report published by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) last week discusses the effects of digitization in India. Researchers report a surge in mobile money transfers- and the surge in mobile money transfers was enhanced by a targeted intervention program giving incentives for businesses to adopt a new, mobile payment economic model.

Is America being coerced to go cashless?

3 Green New Deals for Everybody

Green Energy investments will be a priority in COVID-19 economic recovery schemes. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

One of Agenda 2030’s top priorities is managing Earth’s natural resources. “We are determined to protect the planet from degradation, including through sustainable consumption and production, sustainably managing its natural resources and taking urgent action on climate change, so that it can support the needs of the present and future generations.”

Guterres sees COVID-19 as an opportunity “to embed long-term sustainability and inclusivity” in economic recovery plans throughout Southeast Asia. He also projects “scaling up green energy investments in decarbonizing economies.”

Sandrine Dixson-Declève, Club of Rome co-president, also wants to stop carbon-based investments. She recently said, “I’m convinced that going back to business as usual and bailing out high carbon-producing industries and hard-to-abate sectors (like the aviation sector, car manufactures, and the fossil fuel industry) is not the right path forward. The only path to follow is to stop investing in stranded assets- such as infrastructure that uses fossil fuel reserves- particularly coal, and instead, move on to building the decarbonized infrastructure that we need to meet our climate neutrality goals in Europe and the Paris Climate Agreement goals globally.”

4 Redefining Human Rights

Expect major social changes in the name of human rights. Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

It’s no secret the United Nations uses human rights issues to catalyze social changes.

Virtually every progressive change which claims to be grounded in human rights can be linked to the UN, including those linked to high-profile sports (such as the Washington Redskins name change), non-normative sexuality, borderless migration, and justification for abortion.

“Upholding human rights,” says Guterres, “remains an important bedrock.” As nations rebuild, the Secretary-general says the post-COVID recovery needs to include “respecting and fulfilling fundamental human rights and protecting civic space.”

COVID-19 brings healthcare to the forefront of human rights discussions, and it appears primed to be exploited. Guterres insists “a stronger rights-based approach needs to be integrated in national emergency and health emergency protocols.”

That announcement is particularly troubling when taken in the context of the development of worldwide vaccines. Will there be a vaccine mandate in order to get a healthcare passport to return to work or to engage in otherwise normal activities?

Agenda 2030 “envisions a world free of poverty, hunger, disease, and want, where all life can thrive.” How far will they go to force us to live disease-free?


Doug Carter writes about cultural issues from a biblical perspective. Join him live at 9:00 pm EST at pjnet.tv the first Monday of every month. You can also connect with him on Twitter or Parler.

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Published by Doug Carter

Doug Carter is a graduate of North Carolina State University and Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Besides teaching ethics and Bible courses, he writes about cultural issues from a biblical perspective. His work has been featured on the Rush Limbaugh Show, WND, Western Journalism, Freedom Outpost, et.al. Come join him every first Monday at 9:00 pm EST on pjnet.tv.

2 thoughts on “4 Ways COVID-19 Will Change Our World

  1. It seems we are moving closer to this Agenda 2030 goal with each decision made. I realize it is perhaps inevitable for this world, as it has been prophesied, yet I pray daily for Christ’s return for His church before this is realized. I do not wish to be a part of that world.

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